In peppered moths, color is controlled by a single pair of alleles. The allele for dark coloration (D) is dominant

In peppered moths, color is controlled by a single pair of alleles. The allele for dark coloration (D) is dominant to the allele for light coloration (d). The initial moth population consists mostly of light-colored moths. Industrial pollution then discolors the bark of most trees in the environment to a much darker shade than normal. After several generations, only 25 percent of the remaining moths are light-colored.

THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS.1. If the population enters into and remains in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium at this point, what will the frequency of the light-colored allele be after three additional generations?2. What is the frequency of the dark-colored allele after three additional generations?3. If there are 400 moths in the population after the three additional generations, how many of them are expected to be heterozygous for coloration?4. If there are 400 moths in the population after the three additional generations, how many of them are expected to be h.o.m.o.zygous dominant?5. Why was the presence of genetic variation important to the survival of the moth population?6. Identify and explain three possible sources of genetic variation within a population.

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